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Wednesday
Sep 10, 2008
Perl: Scientific Computing with Math::GSL
Free Geek

Wed. September 10th, 6:53pm at FreeGeek -- 1731 SE 10th Ave.

Speaker: Jonathan Leto Topic: Scientific Computing with Math::GSL

This talk will be an introduction to doing scientific computing with Perl and Math::GSL. This module provides access to functions from the GNU Scientific Library via Perl code.

Why would you want to do that? Using the Perl interpreter's easy and fast I/O, string processing, and managed memory reduces programming time while GSL's optimized numerical library (compiled C) gives you access to a variety of mathematical routines to do the heavy lifting.

http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ http://search.cpan.org/dist/Math-GSL/

You do not need to know Perl or bring a lab coat. You should bring your scientist friends (steal their lab coat?) and it helps if you know how to program in some language (FORTRAN anyone?), or something about math.

As always, social hour at the Lucky Lab after the meeting.

Website
Wednesday
Nov 12, 2008
Portland Perl Mongers: Cisco Log Parsing - Good, Bad and Ugly
Free Geek

Wed. November 12th, 6:53pm at FreeGeek -- 1731 SE 10th Ave.

Speaker: Gabrielle Roth Topic: 600 Simple Strategies for Sanely Summarizing Cisco Syslogs

Syslog is a handy troubleshooting tool, but only if you actually read what's logged. I wrote a Cisco syslog parser & reporter as part of our network fault-management system. We'll go over:

  • network management basics
  • why we needed this specific tool
  • why I created my own tool from scratch (instead of using an off-the-shelf solution)
  • how I did it & what the results were, and
  • what I'm going to do next.

You don't need to be a Cisco engineer or even know much Perl to get something out of this talk.

As always, the meeting will be followed by social hour at the Lucky Lab.

Website
Wednesday
Dec 10, 2008
PDX.pm: Getting Involved with Rakudo (A Flavor of Perl 6)
Free Geek

This will be a guided "hack session" about getting involved with the development of Rakudo, the first fully-featured Perl 6 implementation, which runs on the Parrot Virtual Machine. There will be a briefing at the beginning of the meeting to bring everyone up to speed and clarify any confusing terminology.

Then we will break into groups and learn-by-hacking on whatever interests the participants. You must be interested in doing something with Perl 6/Rakudo, start now!

The end of the meeting will be a short wrap-up where people voice there experiences working on Rakudo (what needs to be made easier? what rocks? what sucks? what do you want to work on next time?).

PDX.pm normally meets at 7-till-7 (6:53pm) at FreeGeek for roughly an hour or so, then walks a few blocks to the Lucky Labrador Brew Pub for social hour.

Website
Wednesday
Feb 11, 2009
Portland Perl Mongers: Perl in the 21st Century -- Eric Wilhelm
Free Geek

I started using Perl just over six years ago, when 5.6.2 was already getting old and 5.8.1 was on the way. By the time I put my first module on the CPAN, over half of the current contributors had already shipped.

I have often read the source of a core module and asked "Why?" only to discover some unknown feature or historical accident. The history lesson continues all the way into the roots of Unix in some cases, but also often leaves me thinking "So?". And now I am quickly approaching my 40th CPAN distribution.

In this talk, I will share my own experiences in developing with Perl and explore the idea of the "Modern" or "Enlightened" Perl. Did I miss the heyday of Perl or are we still making that now? How does today's Perl code look different than it did 5 or 10 years ago? Is there a Perl renaissance coming, and what does it have to do with Perl 6? What modules should you be using for new development? Where is my flying car? Why am I still programming in Perl? And why am I programming at all?

I will try to find answers to some of these questions and invite you to bring questions (or answers!) of your own.

As always, the meeting will be followed by social hour at the LuckyLab.

Website
Wednesday
Mar 11, 2009
Portland Perl Mongers: Test::Builder 2 -- Michael Schwern
Free Geek

Test::Builder underpins 80% of the tests on CPAN. Its limitations become everyone's limitations. It's done a very good job adapting the last seven years, and testing has become more sophisticated in that time, but age and backwards compatibility holds things back. There are a number of desired features which Test::Builder cannot support, such as end-of-test actions, without radically altering how tests are built.

thus: Test::Builder2.

This will be "something of a talk" followed by some hacking both on Test::Builder2 directly and writing new test modules. It'll give folks an opportunity to work both with Moose (well, Mouse) and git. Pair programming will make life easier, we can pair of experienced folks with inexperienced. Or just huddle together for strength in numbers. I find it easier to pair when each person has their own keyboard, so I'm going to bring along a few spare keyboards and mice. I encourage others to do the same.

Website
Wednesday
Apr 8, 2009
Portland Perl Mongers: Moose (A Postmodern Object System) -- hdp
Free Geek

Moose is a postmodern object system for Perl 5.

Moose's recent rise in popularity has led to a surge of declarative class-building and accessor-generating modules, but the real power of Moose comes from its metaclass fundamentals, not from the syntactic sugar of has(). Using Moose as a foundation makes it easier for your code to grow and scale.

I'll cover some of the concepts in Moose that the MOP (Meta-Object Protocol) makes possible, especially roles and type constraints. If we have time, I'll go through a simple Moose extension, focusing on the mechanisms Moose provides to help your code play nicely with others'.

If the first sentence of this description was news to you, you should at least read the SYNOPSIS of Moose, and if you can get through Moose::Manual and Moose::Manual::Concepts, so much the better. I'll expect a lot of questions, but I hope to move past "what is an object" pretty quickly. By the end of the night I hope you'll have a better understanding of the depth of what Moose provides, and why has() is only the tip of the iceberg. I don't expect that everyone will immediately understand every concept provided – my goal is to impress you so much with Moose's awesomeness that you're willing to follow up later on the documentation pointers that I throw out.

Website
Wednesday
May 13, 2009
Perl Mongers: QA Panel / Tool Expo
Free Geek

PDX.pm meetings are on the second Wednesday of each month at 6:53pm, typically at Free Geek. Meetings are free-of-charge for all PortlandPerlMongerMembers. The cost for non-members is $2,000,000,000.00 per person.

What tools and techniques do you use to keep your project shiny and well-oiled? Bring a sample for show-and-tell, or just a few things to say about it.

Please see the kwiki link for the latest details about this meeting. Our panels always lead to interesting and surprising discussion.

Website
Thursday
Jul 2, 2009
PDX.pm Perl 5.10.1 Codesprint
Lucky Labrador Brew Pub

Codesprint for learning about Perl 5 development, git and getting 5.10.1 out the door. This is our first codesprint, so things are still a bit up in the air.

Useful stuff:

5.10.1 blockers: http://tr.im/perl5_10_1_blockers

Using the Perl git repo: http://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git/blob/HEAD:/pod/perlrepository.pod (short and sweet)

How to hack the Perl internals: http://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git/blob/HEAD:/pod/perlhack.pod (kinda scary)

Wednesday
Aug 11, 2010
Portland Perl Mongers: Relational DB vs Key-Value Store and Beyond
Free Geek

Panel: Selena Deckelmann, Igal Koshevoy, Jeff Lavallee, David Wheeler

This will be a panel discussion about the ups, downs, ins, and outs of relational, row, key-value, and hierarchical data stores (simplistic buzzwordiness: SQL vs NOSQL aka ACID CRUD.)

The panel will discuss parallelism, scale, data integrity, normalization, business logic, ORMs, and performance. Some of the following might be addressed:

  • why do you want a relational DB?
  • why do you not want a relational DB?
  • Membase, MongoDB, Redis, Cassandra
  • Tokyo Tyrant, CouchDB, old school K/V (zodb, bdb)
  • distinctions between "relational" and "row store"
  • how filesystem settings affect the database
  • how important is your data?
  • common errors in SQL schemas or usage
  • is count(*) supposed to be fast?
  • efficiency vs speed vs parallel cleverness
  • sharding
  • what is "scale" and do you need it?
  • massively denormalized, or massively normalized?
  • ORMs, materialized views, indexes, and the query planner
  • typical performance with small/large, simple/complex data sets

As always, the meeting will be followed by social hour at the Lucky Lab.

Website
Wednesday
Dec 8, 2010
Portland Perl Mongers: Three Talks for the Price of One
Free Geek

We will be having three lightning-ish talks at PDX.pm this month.

Perl and Parrot in Google Code-In : Highlights and How To Get Involved

-- Jonathan "Duke" Leto

Tool::Bench : A Generalized Benchmarking Framework for Just About Anything

-- Ben Hengst

Graphics in Software Documentation : Why The Void?

-- Otto Hirr

Please come by and be sure to come hang out afterwards at the Lucky Lab social hour, just a few blocks away.

Website
Thursday
Dec 11, 2014
Portland Perl Mongers
Free Geek

Join us at Freegeek for this month's installment of PDX.pm.

As always, join us for beers at the Lucky Lab after the meetup.

Thursday
Jan 8, 2015
Portland Perl Mongers - Perl in the PEARL edition
PIE: Portland Incubator Experiment

NOTE: Change of Venue!

We're going to change things up this month and will be hosting our first meeting of the year downtown. Join us at the Portland Incubator Experiment (PIE) office, located at 12th and NW Davis.


Dana Jacobsen will give a talk on his number theory module. This is an early version of the talk for FOSDEM.

This talk describes the history, design, and implementation details of a number theory module for Perl. With implementations for most functions in C, C+GMP, and Perl this offers speed on most platforms as well as portability. Comparisons will be made with tools such as Pari/GP, SymPy, SAGE, Primo, OpenPFGW, and others.

Full synopsis here

We'll migrate to Life of Riley or another nearby venue after the meeting for drinks and food.

Website
Thursday
Feb 12, 2015
Portland Perl Mongers - Documenting Perl and Alternatives to POD
PIE: Portland Incubator Experiment

Join us at the Portland Incubator Experiment (PIE) office, located at 12th and NW Davis.

Stefan and Anthony will be discussing some new alternatives to POD that they've both been working on. Stefan has been working on parsing Markdown formatted documentation out of Perl source. Anthony has been working on an extension to the Sphinx documentation engine to support writing rST formatted documentation in Perl source. Both attempts are in their infancy, so be sure to give feedback and suggestions.

If anyone else would like to join in, or if someone wants to defend lowly ol’ POD, you’re welcome to join in as well.

Full synopsis

Website
Thursday
Mar 12, 2015
Portland Perl Mongers - Perl in the OpenBSD base system
Free Geek

Join us back at Freegeek this month for a talk by Andrew on Perl in OpenBSD.

Andrew Fresh will be previewing his hopeful YAPC::NA talk on Perl in the OpenBSD base system.

Perl 5.003 was imported as part of the OpenBSD base system in 1996 by Jason Downs (downsj@) and has been used heavily ever since. Quite a few system utilites are written in perl, one of the largest being Marc Espie's (espie@) rewrite of the package management tools and his amazing dpb (distributed package build) tool. Andrew is the current maintainer for perl in OpenBSD and wants to share what's going on.

Full synopsis

Join us afterwards at the SE Lucky Lab for drinks and more conversation.

Website
Thursday
May 14, 2015
Portland Perl Mongers - Failure: Why it happens & How to benefit from it
Free Geek

Join us back at Freegeek this month for a talk by VM Brasseur on project failure.

Projects fail in droves. Up to 90% of new businesses fail within 10 years. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place.

Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your project. Failure is a vital part of evolution. By learning to love failure we learn how to take the next step forward. Ignoring or punishing failure leads to stagnation and wasted potential.

Full synopsis

Join us afterwards at the SE Lucky Lab for drinks and more conversation.

Website