Viewing 4 current events matching “agilepdx” by Date.

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Wednesday
Jun 21
AgilePDX Downtown: Discovering Your Team's Values with LEGO Serious Play!
Puppet

At AgilePDX Downtown in June, Paul Wynia is facilitating a fun interactive workshop with us!

Teams are tricky things, they get even trickier when a team fails to come together as a cohesive group of individuals. One of the steps to getting through the Forming/Storming phases and onto the Performing stage is creating a set of team values and defining how those values translate to behaviors. In this fun, interactive session we'll explore team values with LEGO Serious Play. Using these methodologies, we ensure that all team members are engaged, have a voice, and can influence the final outcome while at the same time reducing the stress and conflict that can occur.

Speaker Paul Wynia is an Agile Coach, Consultant, and Trainer with 20 years of software industry experience. Paul is also a Licensed Trainer of the Lego® Serious Play® methodologies http://www.strategicplay.com/ and uses Agile Games and simulations to incorporate collaboration, creativity, and innovation into teamwork. He is co-host of the http://agilegamespodcast.com/ and co-chair of the annual http://agilegameswest.com/ conference.

Website
Friday
Jun 23
Agile PDX Westside: Finding Useful Metrics for the Team
Nike Evergreen campus cafeteria (20540 NW Evergreen Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124)

W. Edwards Deming said in his book Out of the Crisis, "The most important figures that one needs for management are unknown or unknowable, but successful management must nevertheless take account of them." Are metrics truly valuable for our teams and who is the most important audience? What dysfunction might we introduce with "measurable" metrics? What positive results could we see with collecting team data?

Let's explore the benefits, risks, and how to avoid abuse of metrics as they relate to teams. Bring your worst nightmares, your success stories, then let's compare and see how we can effectively evaluate the use of metrics and the types of metrics we use in our Agile teams.

Website
Friday
Jul 7
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: How Much Data Are We Gathering?
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

How do we measure success? How do we measure success without data??

Many teams forget to collect data about the work. In the heat of battle, data collection seems so much less important than getting the code cut and the customer satisfied. Folks, we need all kinds of help here.

How do you collect data? Is it passive? Does it just happen as you work? How much data is laying around in your workplace just waiting to be scoped up, looked at, talked about, and learned from? How much better would your life be if you had real data to base your improvement plans and your problem solving on?

Please come with your pointers, and stories, and techniques for collecting and using data with low pain and high value outcomes. Okay, tell us about the high pain and low value data collection experiences, too. After all, there's beer.

We'll be in the back. We start on time and end on time. Please try to do likewise. RSVP's welcome but not required at [email protected].

Website
Wednesday
Jul 19
Agile in Context: How to Improve Agile Development Using the Cynefin Framework
Puppet

Have you ever wondered why some Agile concepts work well in one context and not so well in other contexts? With so many tools, techniques, models, methods, practices, and principles available, how do you decide which ones are appropriate for a given situation?

Agile methods, practices, and principles are successful primarily because they are effective heuristics. Heuristics are anything that provide a plausible aid or direction in the solution of a problem. All heuristics work by exploiting the structure of an environment, so heuristics work well in some environments and less well (or not at all) in others. We need to understand why and where Agile methods and practices work - and where they don’t - in order to adopt, tailor, use, and improve them.

Cynefin is a sensemaking framework that helps people understand their context or situation in order to take appropriate action. The Cynefin framework can be used to select Agile heuristics appropriate for the environment (e.g. use Scrum here, and Kanban there) rather than defaulting to a single, recipe-based approach for all situations. Agile heuristics are especially important and useful for complex and complicated environments, where practitioners must work continuously to understand their context, and then respond quickly and flexibly to meet rapidly-changing needs.

Agile in Context helps practitioners understand not only how, but also why Agile methods and practices work across different contexts. Understanding Agile in context increases the chances for successful adoptions and highlights areas where new methods need to be developed or repurposed from other disciplines. Treating Agile as a set of heuristics will also reduce recipe-based, dogmatic approaches that are fairly pervasive in the community at large today.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the session, participants should be able to: -- describe what heuristics are and why they work -- describe the Cynefin Framework -- use the Cynefin framework to identify and select heuristics to improve Agile development -- find additional information for continued learning

Optional Pre-Work: A Leader’s Framework for Decision Making https://hbr.org/2007/11/a-leaders-framework-for-decision-making

About the Speaker:

Dan Walsh is a Founder and Principal of nuCognitive (www.nuCognitive.com). He has over a decade of expertise in accelerating product development, driving culture change, and transforming organizations. As a recognized leader in Lean Startup, org transformations, and complex adaptive systems, Walsh helps clients to resolve complex, intractable problems resistant to traditional methods. He is an advocate for the integration of learning with work, the cultivation of cultures where people thrive, and the application of heuristics to deliver holistic solutions to customer problems.

Dan Walsh has a BS and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Texas A&M. He also has an MS in Systems Engineering and an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Website

Viewing 30 past events matching “agilepdx” by Date.

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Friday
Jun 2
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Is the Team Responsible for Delivery or Delivering Value
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

What do we really expect from an agile team? Are they expected to just deliver what they're told? Participate in deciding what to deliver? Or, are they really supposed to be focused on delivering value? Does any of this have to do with their maturity and the extend to which they are caught in a web of constraints and impediments?

We have opinions. How about you?

Come down to Ringler's and join in the fun. There's food, there's beer--and you and us!

Website
Thursday
Jun 1
Agile Practitioners Book Club: Reading Joy, Inc.
Lucky Labrador Brew Pub

This month, the Agile Practitioners Book Club meets to discuss Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love:- by Richard Sheridan

The book looks at the workplace and how designing spaces with joy in mind influences the organization. May of you have probably had experiences (hits and misses?) with designing with the team health and happiness in mind. Come share your ideas on the book and the topic in general - over a beer with your Agile peers.

We'll be meeting at Lucky Lab on Hawthorne and hope to see you there!

Website
Friday
May 26
Agile PDX Westside: Anti-patterns of Agile journeys: Avoiding Dysfunction
Nike Evergreen campus cafeteria (20540 NW Evergreen Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124)

If we are “doing agile” why isn't every team “doing it the same”? Let’s chat about the reasons (positive and negative) about the differences between teams at your organizations. What it the impact on the individuals and companies? Why should we be similar in actions? Where does it make sense to differ? How do we avoid dysfunctions between teams, management, and other important roles & partners as we honor differences?

Website
Wednesday
May 17
Four Viewpoints on SAFe
Puppet

The Scaled Agile Framework has become a strong force among enterprises pursuing agility. And with it have come strong opinions—in some cases, almost armed camps. This makes no sense. So, in the pursuit of sense, AgilePDX will host a panel of four experienced agilists all with different perspectives on SAFe, from the relatively naïve, to the roundly and soundly certified, to the confirmed skeptic. Come join us. This ought to be a ball!

Come prepared to hear four distinct viewpoints and bring your questions. We have experts!

Jean Richardson (panel facilitator), like many of our panelists, is a member of the AgilePDX Coordinating Committee. She is a coach providing support and guidance for agile-aspiring organizations and leaders in transition grappling with models that function to support agility and navigate complexity. Her background includes depth in traditional and agile project management, formal mediation, and training. Her client list ranges from large (Intel, State of Oregon, City of Portland, Portland General Electric, and Cambia Health Systems) to small (Idealist and Thug Interactive) organizations. Her background in SAFe includes many years of observation and some training (SAFe Agilist certification) with a dip in the pool to test the pH. She was a reviewer on the Enterprise Agile track for the Agile Alliance 2017 conference.

Dave Gipp is currently supporting agile teams on a large SAFe transformation in Portland as a part of the agile coaching cohort at Slalom consulting. Over ten years ago, he began his agile journey dealing with issues of scaling while with Laika Animation Studios as the lead agile coach for their software R&D division. Since that time Dave has worked with dozens of large organizations, such as Cisco, DreamWorks, Marvel, Lattice, and Nike, helping them build and scale their agile fluency. Dave is a SAFe Program Consultant (SPC4), Certified Facilitator/Coach (icAgile ATF), Certified Scrum Practitioner (CSP) and Certified Scrum Master (CSM). Dave is also fluent in organizational transformation and is Prosci® Change Management certified.

Lorie Gordon has a background in Software Engineering, leading teams for the past 10 years in a three-fold role of Software Development Manager, Scrum Master, and Project Manager. Working for four global organizations, Lorie has led several distributed teams with members in North America, APAC, EMEA, and Armenia. Her first team lead a successful grassroots initiative to bring Agile-scrum into the software development practice and across the organization. Once the framework was proven, she guided the continued adoption of Agile-scrum partnering and reducing silos within co-located offices and across the globe.

Lorie focuses on coaching and practicing scrum within a team-oriented framework as a dedicated Scrum Master. Her recent introduction to SAFe is teaching her a formal enterprise level planning method that is partially implemented in teams she works with. She volunteers with AgilePDX and attends local gatherings including AONW, ProductCamp, and PNSQC.

Adam Light helps technology leaders use Lean and Agile methods to deliver results and build innovative high-performing organizations. As a consultant to enterprise clients, Adam focuses on pragmatic techniques that increase organizational capacity by improving leadership capability. Adam has more than 20 years of technology experience. He began his career as a software developer before becoming a manager of projects and people. Adam first experienced the power of Lean and Agile methods when he implemented them as Director of Planning and Program Management at TransUnion and has run his own consulting practice since 2008.

Adam is a founding member of the Agile Fluency Project, which helps coaches, consultants, and change agents put the insights of the Agile Fluency Model into practice. The Agile Fluency Project envisions a world where Agile is done well in every organization, where all teams practice effectively to sustain continuous improvement, and where each team performs at a level of fluent proficiency that is fit to purpose.

Rhea Stadick applies leading edge techniques to accelerate business results across complex, global organizations. She's driven by the need to do the right things right and ensure healthy workplaces that support diversity of thought and encourage continuous improvement and learning. Over the last 10 years she's led grassroots efforts and initiatives to establish improved ways of working that focus on fast value delivery and sustainable development. As one of the early adopters of Agile at Intel Corporation, Rhea helped to foster other change agents in this space and cleared a path to enable Agile to be an accepted and embraced way of working across 100,000+ people and over 60 countries. As a systems engineer, she has developed an expertise in Complex Adaptive Systems and applying practical methods to work in dynamic contexts. Rhea is a TEDx speaker and keynoter on topics including new approaches for modern business and thriving in changing environments. She currently consults on large Agile transformations.

Website
Friday
May 5
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Team Health and Happiness Metrics
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

What are the characteristics of team health? How do you know if your team is happy? Are there metrics for this? Yes!

Come on down to Ringler’s and sit in with the Pub Lunchers while they talk about team health and happiness, what metrics they’ve found useful, and whether you should even use metrics to measure health and happiness. (Happiness? Metrics?)

You know where to find us: We'll be in the back. RSVP's not required but very much appreciated at [email protected]. It helps us alert the pub to staff appropriately. We start on time and end on time. We encourage you to do so, as well.

Website
Saturday
Apr 29
PDX Women In Tech (PDXWIT) N/NE Lean Coffee Gathering
Elevated Coffee

Please RSVP on Eventbrite

Women and other underrepresented groups in tech, particularly those who call North and Northeast Portland home, are invited to a special Lean Coffee networking event. This is a great opportunity to cross boundaries and broaden networks in a safe space. IntraEdge Technology Service & Solutions is happy to host us at Elevated Coffee House. The event is geared towards those who “find ourselves at the edges of the bell curve of demographics in tech fields,” as Brittany Newhouse so eloquently put it. If you’d like to start your Saturday off with a casual networking event, join us!

Don’t be intimidated by the Lean Coffee format; it’s not just for Agile practitioners. It’s simply an informal way to meet and discuss what interests and affects us.

The meetup will run from 8:30am -10:00am. Be there early to make your order before we start; coffee and snacks will be provided. This event is sponsored by PDXWIT, AgilePDX and Portland Lean Coffee.

Have questions? Ask the organizer Davia - [email protected]

PDXWIT is a community-based non-profit organization. Our purpose is to strengthen the Portland women in tech community by offering educational programs, partnerships, mentorships, resources and opportunities. We are unifying a supportive environment for current and potential women in tech, all of whom are committed to helping each other. Our goal is to bring together and empower women in tech and to encourage others to pursue tech careers. This is our step towards reducing the gender imbalance in the industry and addressing the current negative effects of that imbalance on women.

Trans and non-binary people are always welcome at our events.

Website
Friday
Apr 28
Agile PDX Westside: Building & Maintaining Self-Organized & Self-Directed Teams
Nike Evergreen campus cafeteria (20540 NW Evergreen Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124)

A self-organized team is perhaps the holy grail of agile. Ideally, scrum masters work themselves out of a job as the team becomes less dependent on managers, scrum masters, and project managers. But how is this achieved; what does it take to get there? Can a scrum master simply step away from a self-directed team yet everything remains seamless? Or does a team still benefit from coaching and facilitation to improve sprint after sprint? Let’s share our successes and failures of teams past and present so as a community we can seek that holy grail!

Limited spots! Reserve your seat at https://www.meetup.com/AgilePDX-User-Group-Portland-Metro/events/239176786/ before the waitlist kicks in.

Doors open half hour before noon for those who wish to purchase a lunch and settle in before we begin.

Need more hints and tips about one of our newest locations? http://agilepdx.org/westside_hints_and_tips.html

Website
Wednesday
Apr 19
AgilePDX: First, Ignore the Resume - Reexamining Hiring Practices to Improve Diversity
Puppet

The tech industry has a contentious relationship with diversity. Despite years of highly publicized initiatives aiming to improve diversity in our field, reports show only marginal improvement in the most well-intentioned workplaces. On the contrary, the recent news is full with fresh accounts of issues in tech companies. So, if we care so much about diversity, what’s holding us back from making real progress? Why do we often have such homogeneous teams, and where does this selection start? And what actually makes up a diverse team?

Drawing from his experience as a hiring manager, Dennis explores the biases hidden inside our own hiring practices that can screen out high-quality job candidates. Covering case studies, he shares what the building blocks are for a diverse team, and why we would want to strive to create (or join) one. Dennis’ own non-traditional background made him aware how valuable diverse teams can be, where people with different perspectives collaborate in unique ways to generate novel solutions.

Come bring your questions and an open mind, and join this important discussion. All of us are responsible to recognize where people are marginalized and excluded, especially in the current climate. Being agile means finding better ways to implement things. Let’s be agile about diversity.

BIO: Dennis, a native Portlander, began his career in L.A. working in Film and TV. Four years ago he returned to Portland and joined the software development world, migrating through the different levels to management and agile coach. His focus now is on hiring and coaching successful (and diverse) development teams.

Website
Thursday
Apr 13
AgilePDX Book Discussion: Beyond Legacy Code by David Scott Bernstein
Toffee Club

Book summary: https://pragprog.com/book/dblegacy/beyond-legacy-code

We read technical and business books to educate and improve ourselves. But learning goes through many stages and deepens as we explain our learning to each other, analyze our thinking, evaluate our understanding and apply our learning.

Beyond Legacy Code provides practical information and valuable insight for both engineers and non-engineers. And, don’t skip a good discussion and beer if you’ve just started reading the book or had to put it down. Since this isn’t a who-done-it mystery, a discussion won’t spoil the ending.

Come join us for a lively conversation. Share your thoughts and new ideas with like-minded folks. Meet new smart people and old friends you never knew were so smart! Deepen your understanding and hear new arguments and observations through this book discussion.

Website
Friday
Apr 7
AgilePDX Pub Lunch: How Do You Protect the Team from Human Distractors?
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

You know what we mean: Those people who have "just a quick question" or who "only need the team for an hour or so -- 30 minutes might do it." We're talking about the drive-by executive check-ins on sprint progress, the performance review paperwork that (oops!) has to be done by tomorrow, the security training that someone forgot to announce--until it's due according to a regulatory standard.

And, what about you? Do you ever find yourself being a distraction to the team?

In Agile circles, management is famous for mucking up the works. How do you as a conscientious agilist deal with this? What has to change?

Come on down to Ringler's and bring a manager or two to let them sound off. We'll be your pub lunch therapists sharing what we've learned and what we're still trying to figure out. Bring us your toughest conundrums and your pummeled agilist hearts. Together we'll cogitate and commiserate until you feel ready to face the workplace again.

You know where to find us: We'll be in the back. RSVP's not required but very much appreciated at [email protected]. It helps us alert the pub to staff appropriately. We start on time and end on time. We encourage you to do so, as well.

Website
Friday
Mar 24
AgilePDX Westside Café Lunch: Finding the optimal footprint between Product Owners and their team(s)
Nike Evergreen campus cafeteria (20540 NW Evergreen Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124)

We’re betting a few westsiders will be as excited as we are about this announcement… Westside Café lunches are brownbag sessions facilitated by AgilePDX at the Nike Evergreen campus cafeteria (20540 NW Evergreen Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124) on the fourth Friday each month from 12p to 1p.

Join us on 3/24 to discuss Finding the Optimal Footprint Between Product Owners and their Teams. Teams fall into many categories when it comes to time and attention with their Product Owners: 100% dedicated, 50/50 balance between team and clients, always fighting fires in the field, split between 2+ teams, and many combinations in between. What is the optimal footprint? Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, Devs, QA, etc. bring your Product Owners along, so we get to hear from all sides on the ups and downs of the various levels. We will find some best practices on balancing client needs and expectations with feedback and direction to the teams. Some combinations might surprise you!

We strongly encourage you to arrive early, buy\bring a lunch, and settle in by noon. We start on time and end on time in a format very similar to our popular downtown pub lunches!

Website
Wednesday
Mar 15
AgilePDX: Consciousness Hacking--What'­s That?
Puppet

We’ve always known the art and craft of software development was frustratingly fun, potently world-driving, and part of an ever-expanding set of skills important to living in the modern world. But, now, there’s a field of study and experimentation that appears to show that the consciousness of the teams that develop software inform the software itself.

And, there is software that is designed to heighten our consciousness. What if we used software to heighten the consciousness of software developers to build better products? And why do agilists care? Well: throughput, quality, humane work environments—and things like that. Our panelists will speak to these and related issues of interest to the co-hacking community.

Jean Richardson is a member of the AgilePDX Coordinating Committee, an Agile coach and consultant, developer of the Pervasive Leadership theory, and co-author of “Technical Practices as a Hack on Consciousness: Why to Hack Yourself” published on InfoQ on September 1, 2016. In the course of her nearly 30 years in software development she has progressed through the software development specialties of user and technical documentation, field-based ethnographic usability research, testing, instructional design, business analysis, project management, and spent a stint as the Director of Customer Learning for a small healthcare company. Her client lists include such local luminaries as Cambia Health Systems, Portland General Electric, the City of Portland, the Oregon Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority, Intel, and Tripwire. azuregate.net @JeanAtAzureGate

Julie Nelligan is a personal development coach and psychologist in North Portland. Julie started her career as a coder in the early 90’s focusing primarily on managing large databases before transitioning into coaching. She is also the founder of the Portland Chapter of Consciousness Hacking, a new movement to explore the use of technology in facilitating the process of elevating consciousness. Julie brings a scientific, analytical approach to considering the interface between technology and consciousness. Her work with entrepreneurs combines neurofeedback and coaching to empower them to achieve their goals and aspirations as business owners and individuals. cohack.life eeginfo.com

Aaron Vannatter works as a senior software development consultant with Axian Inc. near Portland, OR. With a decade of professional experience, Aaron has found his niche in full stack .NET web development. He is passionate about championing Purpose-Driven Development, an emerging way of developing software that seeks to be more integrated and life-affirming and to foster the human spirit within the domain of information technology. This work is inspired by Aaron's transformational experiences after a decade of training in the tools, practices and techniques offered by The Way of the Heart™, an international organization dedicated to empowering personal and collective life mission. purposedrivendevelopment.org aaronvannatter.com thewayoftheheart.com

Website
Friday
Mar 3
AgilePDX Pub Lunch: How Do We Measure Value?
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

There’s a lot of talk about throughput and just “getting stuff done” in Agile and Lean environments. We relative size things with story points. We wrapped around the axle about velocity. But, isn’t the point to deliver value for the best quality and price while fostering humane workplaces?

If Agile is about delivering value, then why do we spend the greatest amount of our time on metrics for the delivery side of the house? How can we measure value? How would this help inform prioritization?

Last month’s pub lunchers started digging into this from several perspectives, and they want to dig more. Grab a shovel and come along. Better, yet, grab your PO or PM and come along. We’ll get this figured out over lunch. You'll find us in the back. RSVP's welcome, but not required, at [email protected].

Website
Wednesday
Feb 15
Agile PDX: A Taste of Training from the Back of the Room!
WebTrends

Effectively conveying information and knowledge to others is a critical skill. But how do we, as humans, learn best? When do people start to lose focus on our message? How can you as a coach, facilitator, trainer, teacher (one who wants to help others learn), or presenter use the latest in brain-based learning to help those you are teaching to learn? This brief overview of the content in Sharon Bowman's Training from the Back of the Room! is an invitation to see who is doing the most talking, moving, and writing in all of your communications. You will also get a glimpse of the 6 learning principles and 6 memory vehicles that you might use in your next presentation, training, or coaching session. This interactive session is an invitation to look at how we traditionally teach and how we naturally learn. It expresses the evolution of training from the traditional hierarchical norm to an emergent partnership norm.

Christine Brautigam presents this opportunity to learn how you can be most effective when transferring knowledge to others!

PRE-WORK

This is an opportunity to PRIME your brain by doing a little pre-work in preparation for our time together.

Click below for Sharon's write up on the 4C's = Connections, Concepts, Concrete Practice, Conclusions:

THE 4CS MAP: A BRAIN-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND DELIVERY MODEL

Check this out also as you will be learning about Sharon's famous six learning principles (slideshare):

THE SIX TRUMPS: Six Learning Principles that Trump Traditional Teaching

Also check out a primary body of research upon which Sharon Bowman draws her content and inspiration = John Medina's BRAIN%20RULES

Bio

Christine Brautigam founded Inspired Agility (inspiredagility.com) in 2015 to offer training programs for meaningful work and healthy environments.  Her extensive career experience has been focused on the software industry and is now evolving to bring Agile practices to other industries.  Her current path is through brain-based learning techniques, mindful change management, and deliberately developmental organizations. Christine is a dynamic trainer dedicated to your development. Christine's focus is on tealforteal.com and responsive.org and her education includes: MS in Information Technology Management from Carnegie Mellon University • BS in Industrial and Operations Engineering from University of Michigan • Certified Scrum Master (CSM) • Certified Integral Embodied Practitioner (EPC1).

Website
Friday
Feb 3
AgilePDX Pub Lunch: Velocity and Value Are Not Equivalent
Online Meeting please RSVP via meetup

Do you see your organization confusing velocity with value? Is velocity being emphasized while value is not scrutinized? Do you find teams under pressure to execute against a rigid backlog and when they ask questions about value--there just aren't any answers?

This may appear to be a subtle problem, but some would say the ramifications are significant and far reaching.

Due to the freezing rain forecast for tomorrow, we at AgilePDX have decided to move our Pub Lunch to a virtual meeting. This will allow everybody to stay safe and still participate. Link arms with your Product Owner or Product Manager and login to our virtual, ice free meetup.

Please RSVP via meetup here: https://www.meetup.com/AgilePDX-User-Group-Portland-Metro/events/236954772/

Website
Wednesday
Jan 18
The Rapid Learning Cycles Framework: A Repeatable Adaptation of Agile Development for Tangible Products
Puppet

Katherine Radeka walks us through how the Rapid Learning Cycles framework has emerged as a repeatable method for adopting Agile Development practices for tangible products. It overcomes many of the challenges that companies have had when they have tried to adopt Agile Development, by addressing the mismatches between the software / IT development environment and the challenges faced by scientists and engineers when the product involves physics, chemistry and/or biology.

The Rapid Learning Cycles framework is a synthesis of Agile Development and Lean Product Development practices that works within a company's existing phase gate PDP. It is concrete and actionable for program managers, technical leads and their sponsors so that they can use the framework with confidence after a small amount of training and coaching.

Teams that use the Rapid Learning Cycles framework exhibit the desired changes that people want from Agile Development: fast cycles of development, early engagement from customers and other stakeholders, the ability to respond to change in a dynamic environment, and adapt as new information develops.

They also build scientific knowledge to make better decisions instead of running through build-test-fix loops, capture knowledge real-time instead of reinventing solutions, and make better decisions up front instead of getting stuck with late-found defects and schedule delays.

Session Learning Objectives:

1) What the Rapid Learning Cycles framework is, and how it fits in with Agile Development.

2) What practices from Agile Development get used in the Rapid Learning Cycles framework.

3) What makes the Rapid Learning Cycles framework spread within a product development organization, even one that is resistant to Agile, or seems to be a poor fit.

Bio:

Katherine Radeka has a rare combination of business acumen, scientific depth and ability to untangle the organizational knots to remove the barriers to change. Since 2005, Whittier Consulting Group, Inc. has helped some of the world's leading companies get their products to market faster. She currently supports more than 100 active implementations of the Rapid Learning Cycles framework through the Rapid Learning Cycles Institute (rapidlearningcycles.com)

Katherine is the author of two books. Her first book, The Mastery of Innovation: A Field Guide to Lean Product Development won the Shingo Research Award in 2014. This book contains 19 case studies of companies who have used lean product development to get their ideas to market faster.

Katherine's second book is The Shortest Distance Between You and Your New Product: How Innovators Use Rapid Learning Cycles to Get Their Best Ideas to Market Faster. This book summarizes Katherine's ground-breaking work to integrate Agile Development and Lean Product Development into the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework, a proven method for accelerating innovation.

Katherine has climbed seven of the tallest peaks in the Cascade Mountains and spent ten days alone on the Pacific Crest Trail until an encounter with a bear convinced her that she needed a change in strategic direction.

Website
Friday
Jan 6
AgilePDX Pub Lunch: Why a scrum master is not a secretary
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

Let's kick off the new year and dig down in some great discussion around Agile topics! Last month we voted to discuss "Why a scrum master is not a secretary! (what a scrum master does and does not do)"

Have you ever known a Scrum Master who is the secretary to a team? Maybe even yourself? While this can save other team members time initially and may create a sort of glue or thread for the team, is it positive energy for the team or can it be detrimental? Does it affect our goals to guiding self-organized teams? Bring your stories and experiences, positive or negative. Help other teams, and your own, identify possible problems with Scrum Master implementations and solutions for them.

Website
Wednesday
Dec 21, 2016
AgilePDX Agile Game Night!
Puppet

Winter is coming, let the Agile Games begin! There are some REALLY fun games out there that increase agile understanding, enhance teamwork, and more. Come play some games with fellow agilists to learn new things and take new ideas back to your own teams!

Did someone say Cards Against Agility and Agile Paper Airplanes?

Yes, there's pizza, pop, beer . . . and surplus holiday cookies are really appreciated!

Website
Friday
Dec 2, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Stakeholder Distraction Got You Down?
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

Agile Stakeholders (product owners, product managers, and the like) are key to success, but with customer visits, conferences, product alignment meetings, and staffing constraints they are rarely 100% dedicated to one team. So what do you do when the stakeholders should be more involved?

Once you've tried tantrumming, threatening, begging and pleading, point your feet toward Ringler's on the first Friday in December and just keeping coming until you get here. There's beer and folks who have been where you are now. Have sit and join in the chat. We've got salve for your wounds, and stories to tell. Bring your friends. Bring your stakeholders. It's Friday, and well, we're all on the same side, for better or worse. Those who've figured stakeholder engagement out and those who're ready to give up--perforce.

See you at Ringler's from 12p to 1p. You can come late but come in quiet as a bunny rabbit as we'll be under full steam by 12:05. We'll be in the back. RSVP's welcome, but not required, at [email protected]. It helps us know whether to move the furniture.

Website
Wednesday
Nov 16, 2016
Liftoff! Power up your teams.
Puppet

"[T]he most powerful thing a leader can do to foster effective collaboration is to create conditions that help members competently manage themselves. The second most powerful thing is to launch the team well.” J. Richard Hackman, “Six Common Misperceptions about Teamwork,” Harvard Business Review, June 07, 2011.

Resource staffing isn’t enough. New product development and operations teams need effective Liftoffs to accelerate their start and put them on the trajectory toward success. It's an unexplored, often ignored, yet critical, Agile practice. Through Liftoff, business sponsors, product managers, and product owners, inform, inspire, and initiate their teams. Team members align their work and make a great beginning.

In this talk, Diana Larsen describes ways you can accomplish Liftoff, including Agile Chartering, with real-life stories about effective teams, teamwork, and delivery.

BIO

Diana Larsen is author of Liftoff 2nd ed.: Start and Sustain Successful Agile Teams; Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great; Five Rules for Accelerated Learning; and co-originator of the Agile Fluency(TM) Model. A founding partner of FutureWorks Consulting, she leads the practice area for Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions. Diana delivers inspiring conference keynote talks and has contributed as a leader with Agile Alliance, Organization Design Forum, and the Agile Open Initiative.

Website
Friday
Nov 4, 2016
Establishing Safety in Agile when the Stakes are High
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

How do we make it safe to explore, fail, and grow when the stakes are high? In a world of high complexity & high cost tied to upcoming revenue forecasts, it’s difficult to allow the time we want & need to try new things, learn new skills, and evolve as a team. So, how do we allow time to fail & ultimately grow when the stakes are high? What have you tried that has succeeded? What have you tried that failed? Come share and discover some new ideas to help your teams balance time with business drivers to create success!

As usual, we'll be in the back. We start at 12 and end at 1pm. Those who attend shape next month's topic.

Website
Wednesday
Oct 19, 2016
So, What’s the GROWS Method? A Videoconference Experience
Puppet

To test our ability to bring in Agilists from around the world, this month AgilePDX is sponsoring a live videoconference with Agile Manifesto signer Andy Hunt, who will be talking with us about the GROWS method, which he developed with Jared Richardson.

Everyone claims they are "agile"; but are you and your team actually effective?

Learn the three important steps to creating a truly effective agile team: 1) Lower your risk on software implementation, scalability, usability and more using Tracer Bullet Development; 2) Make accurate decisions and corrections with rapid, real-time feedback using the Continuous Paradigm; and 3) Converge on success with quick, inexpensive GROWS Method Experiments. You and your teams won't need to guess; you'll know.

Pizza and pop are sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Quality Conference.

BIO

Andy started in the do-it-yourself days of CP/M and the S100 bus, of Heathkits and Radio Electronics. Andy wrote his first real program, a combination text editor and database manager, for an Ohio Scientific Challenger 4P. It was a great era for tinkering. Andy started hacking in 6502 assembler, modifying operating systems, and wrote his first commercial program (a Manufacturing Resources Planning system) in 1981. He taught himself Unix and C, and began to design and architect larger, more connected systems.

Andy joined up with Dave Thomas and they wrote the seminal software development book, The Pragmatic Programmer, followed a year later by the original Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide, which introduced the Western world to this new language from Japan. Together they founded The Pragmatic Programmers and are well known as founders of the agile movement and authors of the Agile Manifesto, as well as proponents of Ruby and more flexible programming paradigms. They founded the Pragmatic Bookshelf publishing business in 2003, helping keep developers at the top of their game.

Andy is a founder of the Pragmatic Programmers, founder of the Agile Alliance and one of the 17 authors of the Agile Manifesto, and author of nine books. He is an active musician and woodworker, and continues looking for new areas where he can stir things up.

Website
Friday
Oct 7, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Modern Agile. It's a thing.
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

For years now, various smart people with bright ideas have been saying it's time to rewrite the Agile Manifesto. So far, no traction. Maybe that's a good thing. On the other hand, haven't we learned a thing or two in the last 15 years? And, what does it mean that Agile has moved the horizon of its influence well beyond software development.

Yet another smart person with a bright idea has piped up, and you can learn all about the Modern Agile model here (https://www.infoq.com/news/2016/08/agile2016-modern-agile) and then come down and share your affirmation of the model or it's necessary improvements or stand up for the Manifesto we all love. There's an article, an interview, a video, and a graphic! No matter you're learning style, you can be gratified at the link above.

As usual, we'll be in the back. We start at 12 and end at 1p. Those who attend shape next months topic. RSVP's are welcome but not required at [email protected].

Website
Wednesday
Sep 21, 2016
AgilePDX: Agile Metrics - Speed, Quality, Accuracy, Joy
Puppet

Software and product development are being considered a strategic business process, and it's evident now more than ever before that all teams need quantitative goals. Discover the hard-won lessons of how to measure the right things over time and some of the secrets of the most productive teams.

Presenter: Dave Shanley Co-Founder, CEO, Notion

Data changes the conversation. Good teams can become great teams. Dave wants all teams to have the tools they need for making the best decisions. Dave brings his experience growing a company from his apartment through acquisition to IPO (CrowdCompass, acquired by Cvent, NYSE:CVT) and years building technology for the Fortune 500 (Syclo, acquired by SAP). When Dave isn't digging in to the latest numbers, he's dreaming of sailing trips with the Notion team.

Website
Friday
Sep 2, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Adopting Agile Within Your Sphere of Influence
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

Last month’s pub lunchers voted for a familiar topic with a bit if twist: How can you adopt Agile principles, practices, and methods on your team when you’re in a non-Agile friendly organization? How does personal influence play into a Team’s ability to be Agile? Is there hope for Agility in a desert of non-Agility?

Experienced Agilists say, when has it been different at the beginning?

But, the socially aware change agent wants to know how to be Agile without building in an eventual backlash. Smart change agent. On September 2nd, we’ll pour the beer, circle the wagons, and tell a few stories around the campfire of agility. We hope McMennamins won’t mind the smoke as we nurture the fire of hope for agile-aspiring change agents everywhere.

So, come on down to the usual place at the usual time with your comrades and stories. Come alone or come in a pack. We’ll be in the back.

RSVP’s not required but gratefully accepted at [email protected].

Website
Friday
Aug 5, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: Report Back: Bringing the Team to the Work
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

As requested by attendees last month, Jama comes back this month to talk about the experiments its been running in bringing the team to the work.

Agile development practices encourage static teams with predictable velocities. However, this sometimes means giving projects to teams that may not be staffed appropriately to get it done as effectively and efficiently as possible. Jama has flipped this theory on its head and is focusing on trusting our teams to self-select onto projects they’re interested in tackling given our business and engineering priorities. In doing so our goals are to decrease epic lead time and increase quality and engagement in the work we are doing.

Cristian Fuentes has 12 years software experience working in various small startups and large IT organizations. As a developer Cristian has worked on teams experimenting with and using various XP, agile, scrum and Kanban practices and processes. Cristian is currently an Engineering Manager at Jama Software where he joined in the very early startup stage and experienced the growth and evolution of the product and engineering organization. Through this growth, the Jama engineering team has evolved and adapted to a changing landscape in pursuit of effective and empowering ways to work.

RSVP's are not required but gratefully accepted at [email protected]

Website
Friday
Jul 1, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: How do Agile developers feel about DevOps?
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

How do Agile teams think and feel about DevOps?

DevOps is a term for a group of concepts that, while not all new, have catalyzed into a movement and are rapidly spreading throughout the technical community. Like any new and popular term, people have somewhat confused and sometimes contradictory impressions of what it is.

Here’s one take: DevOps is the practice of operations and development engineers participating together in the entire service lifecycle, from design through the development process to production support.

Here's another: DevOps is also characterized by operations staff making use many of the same techniques as developers for their systems work - such as: using source control to testing to participating in an Agile development process - like sprints or kanban and regular check-ins to communicate with the entire team.

You may have your own take - so come join the discussion and share.

The Downtown Pub Lunchers care enough to have voted this topic in last month with a participating attendance of 40 pub grub munching agilists. Come on down and help us sort this one out. You probably have the answer. There’s beer, and we’ll be in the back.

Website
Wednesday
Jun 15, 2016
AgilePDX: Gender and Agile Teams. Is There a Problem Here?
Puppet

In September of 2015 the Agile Alliance held a community Open Space meeting in Portland and one of our community facilitated a topic on Agile as a context for improved workplace experience for women. Twelve to fifteen people attended her topic—and split pro and con right down the middle with men and women on both sides. Over the last few months, software-related Meetups all over Portland have held discussions focused on women in STEM and women in software development. Now AgilePDX invites you into an Agile-focused discussion on gender dynamics on Agile teams.

What do you think? Has Agile improved, hindered, or left the issue of gender dynamics completely untouched? Does self-organization mean women have more of a voice? When men and women speak up about gender dynamics on teams is anyone left out? What about “gamergate?” Do the Agile Manifesto and Principles imply anything about gender dynamics on teams? And, if so, what is that? Or, is there something additional in the Agile “secret sauce” that improves (or hinders) how men and women work and play together on Agile teams? Would you want your son or daughter on an Agile team?

This month, AgilePDX gathers a panel of two men and two women to consider the state of Agile and gender diversity.

To follow the conversation before the event, join the AgilePDX Slack.

Panelists:

Megan Bigelow -- a connector and tech community leader, having co-founded Portland Women in Tech (PDXWIT) and continues to serve as its President. In this role she's created a platform to connect tech women to companies, mentors and practical skills. PDXWIT is 2000 strong and includes the support of 30+ tech companies. Above all, Megan has a commitment to building community to solve issues. In her day job, she is the Manager of Customer Support at Jama Software.

Erick Banks -- Sr. Quality Assurance Engineer at Puppet. Hosted the discussion on gender inequality in tech at Agile Open Northwest (http://aonw2015.blogspot.com/2015/02/gender-inequality-in-tech.html). My first degree was in physics, my second in computer science, two of the most male-dominated majors. Incidentally I'm single. Interested in gender equality at work largely for selfish reasons. My hope is for my nieces to feel comfortable entering technical fields like mine without the burden of those fields being so gender imbalanced. I try to keep current on issues concerning gender in the workplace by reading (preferably data driven) articles online, a collection of some of them can be found here: https://github.com/ThoughtCrhyme/TechAndGender

Matt Plavcan -- an Agile and Technical Practices Coach with Intel’s Emergent Systems team. He assists teams within the company adopt Agile practices and build their technical capabilities. His career includes verification of desktop microprocessors and teaching Intel architecture at the University of Illinois. Matt is the founder of the Code Dojo and Coderetreat program at Intel, which uses dedicated practice to hone professional programming skills. He runs similar events for the Portland community, and is a coordinator for the 2016 Global Day of Coderetreat. He posts his coaching and development musings on Twitter (@mplavcan)

Kathryn Gruenefeldt -- Sr. Director of Backend Engineering at Simple, where she leads the team focused on services that reliably manage customers' financial transactions and adds homegrown Simple goodness on top, such as Goals and Safe-to-Spend. Simple is a technology company that’s changing the way people bank and think about their money. Kathryn has spent over 20 years in variety of engineering roles, ranging from Database and Middleware development to Healthcare and Energy Conservation applications. Kathryn has a BA in Computer Science, Finance, and Management from University of Oregon, and a MS degree in Computer Science from University of California, Davis.

Website
Friday
Jun 3, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: The End of Agile
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

We’ve been hearing about it for years. GROW is the new new thing. DevOps builds on Agile and is the new new thing. Hybrid is bad, and Agile only works if you follow the book—right? You got that book? Are we ineffective, tired, fighting back, plodding on, or something else?

Has the practice of what we think of as Agile changed? Can we not be Agile without first being Lean? What about Agile/Lean? When even signers of the Agile Manifesto speak up against Agile, what’s an agilist to think?

Or is agile SAFe and sound and the Agile brand has developed a stink? Too many forced marches to agility? Do we need to start calling “agile” “nimble” in order to make progress? And, frankly, how much do we care about what’s in the press?

The Downtown Pub Lunchers care enough to have voted this topic in last month with a participating attendance of 40 pub grub munching agilists. Come on down and help us sort this one out. You probably have the answer. There’s beer, and we’ll be in the back.

RSVP's not required but much appreciated at [email protected]. It helps determine whether to move the furniture and ask for additional servers.

Website
Monday
May 23, 2016
AgilePDX Dntn Pub Lunch: The End of Agile
McMenamins Ringlers Pub

We’ve been hearing about it for years. GROW is the new new thing. DevOps builds on Agile and is the new new thing. Hybrid is bad, and Agile only works if you follow the book—right? You got that book? Are we ineffective, tired, fighting back, plodding on, or something else?

Has the practice of what we think of as Agile changed? Can we not be Agile without first being Lean? What about Agile/Lean? When even signers of the Agile Manifesto speak up against Agile, what’s an agilist to think?

Or is agile SAFe and sound and the Agile brand has developed a stink? Too many forced marches to agility? Do we need to start calling “agile” “nimble” in order to make progress? And, frankly, how much do we care about what’s in the press?

The Downtown Pub Lunchers care enough to have voted this topic in last month with a participating attendance of 40 pub grub munching agilists. Come on down and help us sort this one out. You probably have the answer. There’s beer, and we’ll be in the back.

RSVP's not required but much appreciated at [email protected]. It helps determine whether to move the furniture and ask for additional servers.

Website