Viewing 1 current event matching “beer linux networking plug education unix bsd devops open source” by Date.

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Thursday
May 4
Portland Linux/Unix Group
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

PLUG: Portland's monthly, three-track open source conference!

Celebrating 20 years of hosting Portland's best open source and technology freedom speakers.

This month's topic To Be Announced

First Thursday: General Meeting at PSU

Third Tuesday: Advanced Topics at Free Geek

Third Sunday: Hands-on Clinic at Free Geek

Website

Viewing 17 past events matching “beer linux networking plug education unix bsd devops open source” by Date.

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Thursday
Sep 3, 2015
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Thinking in ZFS
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Michael Dexter
What: Thinking in ZFS
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, September 3rd, 2015 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

The "Zettabyte File System" was developed at Sun Microsystems and is now available in Oracle Solaris and various open source operating systems thanks to the OpenZFS project. ZFS is big, complex and has many knobs to turn but it is also quite amazing.

This talk will discuss the fundamental issues that ZFS is designed to address and how it addresses them. We will discuss ZFS planning and best and worst practices.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Oct 1, 2015
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Open Source at Microsoft: Azure, Linux, node.js and more
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Scott Hanselman
What: Open Source at Microsoft: Azure, Linux, node.js and more
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, October 1st, 2015 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom

What's with this new Microsoft? What have they open sourced and why are they doing it? How did this culture change happen and where it is heading

Is Linux on Azure useful or reasonable? Join Scott Hanselman, Program Manager at Microsoft and OSCON 2016 Program Chair for this interactive presentation and Q&A. We'll see demos, ramble, and ask hard questions."

Scott is a software architect, speaker, blogger and podcaster who is building bridges between Microsoft and the open source community.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Dec 3, 2015
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Git up 'n' go! A Git and GitHub Crash Course
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting Announcement

Who: Ali Corbin
What: Git up 'n' go! A Git and GitHub Crash Course
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, December 3th, 2015 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

Git and GitHub have become essential tools for contributing to open source projects, even if they are not "code" projects per-se.

This hands-on talk is a crash course on both 'git' and GitHub, the popular project collaboration site. You are HIGHLY ENCOURAGED to bring a laptop configured with both the command line 'git' utility and the credentials for your own GitHub account. Go ahead and create an account if you don't have one: https://help.github.com/articles/set-up-git/

Also note that the PSU WiFi requires WWW/SMS authentication and you may need a few minutes to get it working.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Jan 7, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Rust
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Jim Blandy
What: Rust
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, January 7th, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

Rust is meant to compete with C and C++ in performance, but also provide memory safety. Someone has written a small kernel in Rust.

Rust is only attractive to JavaScript / Python types when they run into a problem where memory consumption or processor consumption is a real limiting factor. Then, it's much easier for them to transition into Rust than C/C++, but Rust gives them the performance they need.

Some Rust killer apps:

  • Mozilla's experimental browser engine, Servo (which outperforms Firefox on a single core, and destroys it when running on four cores);
  • Tilde's Skylight profiling system for Rails apps, which uses Rust to handle the voluminous data produced by running apps: http://www.tilde.io/skylight/

  • OpenDNS, which is again using Rust to handle large amounts of data in real time:

https://labs.opendns.com/2013/10/04/zeromq-helping-us-block-malicious-domains/

Added focus: Concurrency first in Rust

Multiprocessor machines are everywhere: even mid-range mobile devices now often have more than one processor core. But writing concurrent code in C and C++ is challenging even for experienced developers: data races are notoriously difficult to debug, and concurrency makes ordinary memory bugs harder to reproduce. So programmers usually turn to concurrency as a last resort, only after they’ve squeezed as much performance out of their single-threaded code as possible.

But what if concurrency were practical as a method of “first resort?” What if we could design ordinary programs around the opportunities for parallelism they present, without introducing risk and making our code hard to maintain for all but the wizards?

Rust is a new systems programming language from Mozilla, designed for memory safety and trustworthy concurrency. Rust catches data races and memory errors at compile time: you can’t forget to lock the right mutex before accessing shared data, nor can you modify a data structure after handing it off to another thread, nor can you free data that another thread was using, and so on. Rust does not use garbage collection, but instead relies on a simple set of rules for ownership, moving, and borrowing to prevent the kinds of memory errors that plague concurrent C and C++ code. Mozilla has used Rust to implement an experimental browser engine named Servo, which already outperforms Firefox’s Gecko engine on real-world web sites.

This talk will demonstrate various styles of concurrent code in Rust: message passing, shared data protected by mutexes, and lock-free algorithms using atomic memory operations. We’ll show how Rust’s ownership rules, unique among production programming languages, prevent data races. And we’ll show how to take responsibility for correctness yourself when the compiler is too strict, using Rust’s ‘unsafe’ mode.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Feb 4, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: zsh
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Stephen Dum
What: zsh: What is a shell, why do you want to use one, what's so special about zsh
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, February 3rd, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

zsh is yet another computer shell. I'll briefly explore how zsh came to be, and then discuss it's advanced user interface. How it's user interface improves productivity with novel command line completion and auto correction features.

About Steve: Spent decades dealing with large projects (multi-million lines of code) writing code, automating build processes and automated testing of the code. Not to mention, compiler writing, Linux device driver development, and assorted tool development, even genealogy tool development.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Mar 3, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Networking with Puppet and Cumulus
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Kris Amundson
What: Networking with Puppet and Cumulus
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, March 3rd, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Network Switches. This phrase conjures up thoughts of expensive boxes with operating systems out of reach to the user. While CLIs have improved, there are times where you really want a bash prompt to install a cron script or two, or run a packet capture through some python.

That day is here. We now have a few Linux based NOS distributions with a standard linux-server experience with many ports of line-rate ethernet interfaces. We will be exploring Cumulus Linux, a Debian-based NOS that has a growing list of hardware support.

This session will be an introduction to Cumulus and some puppet code on how to configure them. I'll have some hardware in tow and also discuss the virtual image.

About Kris

Kris Amundson is part of the Ops team at Puppet Labs here in Portland. He has been building networks since the mid 90s and his career travels include working for Cisco VARs, operating PSU's campus network, co-founding OpenSourcery, building networks atop wind turbines and running the network for 21 months at the South Pole Antarctica.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG Page with information about all PLUG events: http://pdxlinux.org/ Follow PLUG on Twitter: http://twitter.com/pdxlinux

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
May 5, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Switching to BSD Unix from GNU/Linux
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting

Who: Michael Dexter
What: Switching to BSD Unix from GNU/Linux
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, May 5th, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

By popular vote!

Got the systemd/iptables/wish-I-had-OpenZFS blues?

Relief is just a download away!

BSD Unix has been quietly powering the Internet and a little bit of just about EVERYTHING that rubs ones and zeros together for... ever.

Once named the "Greatest Software Ever Written*", the University of California, Berkeley Computer Science Research Group's "Berkeley Software Distribution" is better than ever in the form of modern FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD and their derivatives.

LEARN what Enterprise-class file systems and firewalls are available out-of-the box on modern BSD Unix

SEE the bhyve "BSD Hypervisor" in action on FreeBSD

FRAG** better on FreeBSD thanks to its faster-than-Linux Linux emulation

** I take people's word for it

This talk was originally proposed by long-time GNU/Linux user Larry Cafiero for LinuxFest Nortwest 2016 but was delivered by Portlander Michael Dexter when Larry could not attend the event.

About Michael Dexter

Michael fell in love with BSD Unix the moment he sat down in front of it at Lewis and Clark College in January of 1991. Since then, he has shepherded five virtualization and containment strategies into three BSDs, raised money for BSD efforts, organized three bhyvecon conferences, written dozens of articles about BSD Unix and spoken about BSD Unix-related topics at more events than he can count.

While PDXBSDCon has yet to take place, Michael is seriously considering printing "PDXBSDCon 2014" t-shirts.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Jun 2, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: HTTP can do THAT?!
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting Announcement

Who: Sumana Harihareswara
What: HTTP Can do THAT?!
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, June 2nd, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Web developers who only know about GET and POST and use the most popular headers and response codes are missing out! Underappreciated verbs, headers, and response codes can boost your web application's performance, flexibility, and testability, and help you better appreciate the structure of the web.

The version of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol you will deal with most is 1.1. As a quick refresher: Clients and servers talk to each other via HTTP messages (requests and responses), which are clear text comprising start-lines, headers, and bodies.

METHODS

GET ("gimme") and POST ("here you go") are overwhelmingly popular, the Dave Matthews Band of methods. To illustrate their importance: you can create an API that allows the user to POST but not GET, but that would be a terrible idea. https://github.com/brainwane/secureapi demonstrates this with Python 2 code using the BaseHTTPServer standard library.

Using POST to mean "Create resource", "Update resource", and "Delete resource" is inelegant! So why do we overload POST, and what are the alternatives? PUT, meaning "create resource," is implemented throughout the HTTP 1.1 ecology and is unambiguously great; be more careful with DELETE, which deletes a resource (as demonstrated with Python 2 code using the BaseHTTPServer standard library and the requests library). It's also worth looking into PATCH and OPTIONS for specialized use cases.

An exciting alternative to GET is HEAD, which requests only the metadata about a resource; if the client really only needs to know whether it could GET a resource, or wants a resource's size, last-modified timestamp, or other information available in its headers, using HEAD instead of GET can speed performance by more than 50%. I demonstrate this using the requests library and the %timeit functionality in IPython.

Also, why am I both discussing good and bad ideas throughout this talk, and how can you tell the difference? Sometimes bad ideas are easy ways to understand edge cases (also, they're funny). The "horror world-to-whiteboard scale" gives you my take on whether or not you should try out what I'm describing.

HEADERS

Call-and-response header pairs such as Last-Modified and If-Modified-Since/If-Unmodified-Since allow the client to conditionally specify its preferences; you can save client-side processing time, and test your application more thoroughly, by knowing and using the right headers. For instance, check for cache problems by using Cache-Control and ETag. (But not all headers are useful; for instance, the From header is basically obsoleted by more advanced analytics and by the User-Agent header.)

We require that clients send a Host header with all requests; Host works with the path specified in the start-line, the two together forming the full address of the resource. Sometimes the host is merely the domain name of the server, but you can't depend on the assumption that the host will be obvious to all the systems between the client and the server. The client might send a request to an IP address, or to one of several virtual hosts that act as subdomains on one host. This level of redundancy can lead to unintended consequences; for instance, by intentionally malforming the Host headers of GET requests, spammers can leave links to their own sites in your access logs.

You can define your own header when sending requests or responses, and many organizations do this; the convention is to prepend "X-" to bespoke headers. It's easy to do this when hand-writing requests, and I'll also demonstrate how to do this in a Python web framework.

RESPONSE CODES

Response codes (a.k.a. status codes) have well-specified semantics. For instance, they come in five numbered classes, and the three-digit integer should be sufficient to explain the response -- the "reason-phrase" (the English explanation) should not be a necessary data point for the client to use when debugging. As several responses sent by real, working web servers demonstrate, if you don't respect this principle, the results can be hilariously confusing.

HTTP includes useful response codes that mean more specific things than "OK" or "nope"; 410 Gone, 304 Not Modified, and 451 Unavailable for Legal Reasons help you and your users move faster, debug, test, and recover from unavailable content.

I demonstrate how to alter the reason-phrases in your web application's response codes, using the http standard library in Python 3: https://gitlab.com/brainwane/http-can-do-that/

From "don't cache this" instructions to look-before-you-leap requests to using the "Content-Disposition" header to tell clients that a resource should be treated as an attachment, HTTP already contains an embarrassment of riches. Reading up on it gives you both a feeling of power, of increased capability, and a sense of wonder, in discovering a new way to look at the world. What might the web have been? What might it still be?

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Jul 7, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Ganesha NFS
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting

Who: Frank Filz
What: NFS Ganesha - A User Space NFS Server for Linux and FreeBSD
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 7th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, July 5th, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

NFS Ganesha - A User Space NFS Server for Linux and FreeBSD

Frank Filz will present on the current state of the NFS Ganesha project. NFS Ganesha is currently undergoing a restructuring that breaks out the meta-data caching as a separate "stackable" File System Abstraction Layer module.

Frank is a Senior Principle Software Engineer at Red Hat and "release manager" (aka maintainer) of the NFS Ganesha project who has been working on NFS Ganesha since 2010, formerly at IBM and Panasas. His current focus is Ceph.

Michael adds: While operating systems are receiving high-performance, in-kernel NFS daemons, the rising popularity of scale-out file systems has renewed interest in projects like NFS Ganesha. Every exciting!

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

See you there!

Website
Thursday
Aug 4, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Designing chips on GNU/Linux
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting Announcement

Who: Tomas Kuchta
What: Designing chips on GNU/Linux
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, August 4th, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Tomas Kuchta will present on the current state of the art GNU/Linux engineering computing in Integrated Circuit (IC) design, verification, test and manufacturing.

He will introduce the complexities and challenges of creating an IC from conception through manufacturing with emphasis on engineering computing and IT infrastructure used.

About Tomas

Tomas Kuchta has been writing software for and designing Integrated Circuits for customers in telecommunication, customer electronics and computing industries for about 20 years.

During his recent post at Intel he specialized, amongst other roles, at designing systems for parallel data processing, analysis and visualization for improving chip design, test and manufacturing yield.

He spent almost decade running both Solaris and Linux engineering computing data center and workstation network for users in manufacturing yield.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG Page with information about all PLUG events: http://pdxlinux.org/ Follow PLUG on Twitter: http://twitter.com/pdxlinux

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Sep 1, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: The State of the IPv6 in Portland
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Ted Mittelstaedt
What: The State of the IPv6 in Portland
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 7th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, September 1st, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Ted Mittelstaedt will discuss the use of IPv6 with Comcast and CenturyLink to allow users on these networks to access IPv6-enabled resources and provide IPv6-enabled services. pfSense and Cisco IOS router examples plus FreeBSD, Linux, Android and Windows workstation configurations will be used.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG Page with information about all PLUG events: http://pdxlinux.org/ Follow PLUG on Twitter: http://twitter.com/pdxlinux

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Oct 6, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Sriram Ramkrishna
What: Ubiquitous Apps with Flatpack
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, October 6th, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Building a Measurable Market - Ubiquitous Apps with Flatpack

With the advent of technologies like Snap and Flatpak (http://flatpak.org), we finally have the opportunity to build a measurable market by changing how distribution of applications and discussing the challenges of moving from the unique Linux distro-centric model to a classic developer one. The presentation will also include an overview of Flatpak if possible.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Nov 3, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting Announcement

Who: Michael Dexter
What: Introduction to FreeNAS
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 7th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live (PSU WiFi Permitting)

Introduction to FreeNAS

Learn the Why and How of FreeNAS, the world's most popular software-defined storage system.

  • Popular Uses
  • Storage and Service Configuration
  • Common Mistakes to Avoid

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG Page with information about all PLUG events: http://pdxlinux.org/ Follow PLUG on Twitter: http://twitter.com/pdxlinux

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Dec 1, 2016
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Configuration Management with Ansible
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Tim Bruce
What: Configuration Management with Ansible
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 7th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, December 1st, 2016 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

Ansible is a configuration management tool to help provision new systems or push configurations and applications to existing systems. Tim will give an introduction to Ansible and explain some of the commands, as well as give a live demo building some new linux containers (with all the normal hazards of a live demo).

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares Available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website
Thursday
Feb 2
Portland Linux/Unix Group: StackStorm
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Who: Matt Oswalt
What: StackStorm
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

StackStorm is an open-source, event-driven automation platform that wires together all of your apps, services and workflows. Also known as "IFTTT for Ops", StackStorm is commonly used for auto-remediation, security responses, facilitated troubleshooting, complex deployments, and more. In this talk, we'll explore some of the problems StackStorm aims to solve, demonstrate some basic StackStorm workflows, and get set up to do event-driven automation on your own.

Matt Oswalt is an automation junkie, currently focusing on building quality software for automation initiatives across technology disciplines, and sharing these ideas with the community. You can find him writing about his experiences at http://keepingitclassless.net, or on Twitter as @Mierdin.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares to the Lucky Lab available

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

See you there!

Website
Thursday
Mar 2
Portland Linux/Unix Group: UnPLUG!
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

Portland Linux/Unix Group General Meeting Announcement

Who: You!
What: UnPLUG!
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom

I have lots of topics to discuss but you should do the choosing.

See you there.

Website
Thursday
Apr 6
Portland Linux/Unix Group: Microcopy: The Art of User Interface Text
PSU Maseeh Engineering Building

PLUG: Portland's monthly, three-track open source conference!

Who: Mike Jang
What: Microcopy: The Art of User Interface Text
Where: PSU, 1930 SW 4th Ave. Room FAB 86-01 (Lower Level)
When: Thursday, April 6th, 2017 at 7pm
Why: The pursuit of technology freedom
Stream: http://pdxlinux.org/live

No one in fact wants to Read The Fine Manual. Adding a user should not require a manual and developers insist they don't need one. This puts the burden on the web and desktop UI designer who must be extremely communicative with only a handful of words.

This talk will walk you through lessons learned writing Microcopy in applications of all sizes.

As a senior technical writer for ForgeRock, Mike Jang spends much of his time documenting how deployers can modify JavaScript to customize web applications. He has also written a couple dozen technical books, mostly focused on Linux certification, and is the author of O’Reilly’s Linux Annoyances for Geeks.

Many will head to the Lucky Lab at 1945 NW Quimby St. after the meeting.

Rideshares to the Lucky Lab available

PLUG Page with information about all PLUG events: http://pdxlinux.org/ Follow PLUG on Twitter: http://twitter.com/pdxlinux

PLUG is open to everyone and does not tolerate abusive behavior on its mailing lists or at its meetings.

Website