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Thursday
Jul 12, 2012
Portland Perl Mongers – Programming in the Future + Intro to Dist::Zilla
Free Geek

speakers: Eric Wilhelm + Jonathan "Duke" Leto

(Rumored cameo / lightning talk by Florian "rafl" Ragwitz.)

Programming in the Future - a preview of the upcoming OSCON presentation covering the last and next 25 years of programming technology using Perl as our time machine. We'll look at the evolution of tools, syntax, modules, and standard practices, the gooey innards, and some "hot new things" which are still being discovered again.

Introduction to Dist::Zilla for Newbies - eliminates your excuses for not learning more about Dist::Zilla and using it on a regular basis. By the end of this talk, you will know how and why to use dzil as your favorite Perl package developer tool, and you might even need to publish more code on the CPAN just to have an excuse to use it more.

As usual, the meeting will be followed by social hour at the Lucky Lab Brew Pub.

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Monday
Jul 29, 2013
Galois tech talk: Type-directed compilation in the wild: Haskell and Core
Galois, Inc

Academic papers often describe typed calculi, but it is rare to find one in a production compiler. Indeed, I think the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC) may be the only production compiler in the world that really has a remorselessly statically-typed intermediate language, informally called "Core", or (when writing academic papers) the more respectable-sounding "System FC".

As real compilers go, GHC's Core language is tiny: it is a slight extension of System F, with letrec, data types, and case expressions. Yet all of Haskell (now a bit of a monster) gets translated into it. In the last few years we have added one new feature to Core, namely typed (but erasable) coercions that witness type equalities, which turn Core into a particular kind of proof-carrying code. This single addition has opened the door to a range of source-language extensions, such as GADTs and type families.

In this talk I'll describe Core, and how it has affected GHC's development over the last two decades, concentrating particularly on recent developments, coercions, evidence, and type families. To test your mettle I hope to end up with the problem we are currently wrestling with: proving consistency of a non-terminating rewrite system with non-left-linear rules.

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